Cookbook Attachment

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I saw a post from Gastro Obscura calling out for submissions:  “Tell us about your most unusual cookbook”.  I didn’t plan to submit one, but I remained somewhat curious.  It prompted me to see if Doug Peterson wanted the topic of cookbooks for his “Whatever Happened to…?” series on his blog.  His readers had some fun interacting with Doug’s take on the topic and his questions here.  Nothing like food and cooking to start up a conversation and spark some memories!

Eventually I returned to the Gastro Obscura website to check out what came together.  There are some interesting and unusual cookbook examples featured for sure in that follow-up post.

In my (long) comment on Doug’s post, I mentioned that I should probably write my own post on the topic.  I have noticed that the topic of cookbooks often brings up stories of “first cookbooks” and stories about when cooking becomes cooking for two (remember the old saying, “The best way to a man’s heart…”, but let’s move on…).  I enjoy stories about favourite go-to cookbooks and recipes that get passed down and shared amongst family members.  It can be a such a strong connection to our past and our loved ones.

I have a very old cookbook meant for kids called Kitchen Fun.  It was my mother’s.  I am not sure how long she had it, but she still used it at times when she cooked for our family.  Most of our suppers would include a meat dish, but sometimes she would pull out that cookbook and make “Yummy Eggs”.  I found it to be a great treat.  Those beaten eggs (with butter) cooked in a “double boiler” were so tasty and fluffy!  I had forgotten that the recipe was from that kids’ cookbook until I received it after my mom’s passing.  The hard cover is worn and stained, as are many of the pages.  I was thrilled to find information about it online since — it was published in 1932 and one can still get a copy or a revised edition through Amazon or eBay (at the time I searched for it).  I also found some blog posts about it!

This blog post has a few good pictures and some interesting details about it.  I had a good giggle at this part,

I have a friend who was a pioneering food writer, and she told me she made the recipe for “Yummy Eggs” from Kitchen Fun on her honeymoon.”

Another blog post shows a few of the vintage cookbook’s pages — I always loved the graphic symbols of ingredients and the measurements required to help young cooks.  This post also mentions “Yummy Eggs”!  Both posts claim that it is a great cookbook for children to use.  (Is it “cookbook” or “cook book”?)

If you were to ask my adult children about “Yummy Eggs”, they would likely tell you that it is a dish their mom made for a quick supper on Halloween night to make sure they had some protein before going out… 😀

I am pleased to see that my adult daughters are developing skills and a good interest in cooking.  I would hope that I would have the same expectations if I had sons.  At times I hear that young adults are not interested in cooking and it gives me some concern.  I hope that is not the general case!  I know it can get very boring and tedious at times, but don’t complain to me unless you have been cooking for over 20 years 🙂

Is there a good “recipe” to keep children and young adults interested in cooking?  Is it still important?  Share your thoughts, or a good story!

And if you wish to try Yummy Eggs… I also have the easy recipe written out on a recipe card:

 

 

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The Cover Debate

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I thought this tweet was both funny and engaging (and the numbers reveal…):

I had a scroll through the responses a few times out of curiosity.  It was Matthew Oldridge’s tweet that led me down initially…

I am not certain if the debate was settled, but I can easily think of covers that I like better than the original.  I might be biased if a cover is by a favourite musician though.  I am sure most people will have a listen to anything a favourite singer or band puts together.  It is likely a very subjective thing.  For example (from responses to the tweet):  The Man Who Sold the World — Bowie or Nirvana?

While there are many songs that I think could not be covered better than the artist’s original version (e.g.  Neil Young’s Harvest Moon, Pink Floyd’s Wish You Were Here, many songs by the Beatles…), there are many covers of songs that I appreciate and some that I only began to enjoy as a cover.

I thought of a few “oldies”:  I didn’t really care for the song Young Folks (by Peter, Bjorn and John) until I heard (sorry) James Blunt’s cover.  Bob Dylan was before my time and I am not really drawn to his voice, but I am glad that many covers of his songs by others have helped me appreciate his talent.  I didn’t care much for Mick Jagger’s Ruby Tuesday and Jigsaw Puzzle, but I love Melanie’s covers of each.  (If you wish to compare.. here and here).  I equally love James Taylor’s original of Carolina In My Mind and Melanie’s cover of the same.  (Thanks to Denise for the reminder of that beautiful “JT” one!)

Some songs get so many covers, for example, Something Just Like This by the Chainsmokers and Coldplay.  I find the original both catchy and annoying, but then I stumbled upon this cover and it appealed to me.  It would be difficult not to appreciate the effort and talent in that cover.  Someone else also commented on the video, “Better than the original..”

I love discovering new music to enjoy and I also like it when good stuff gets attention again through covers.

Please share a favourite cover, or your thoughts on covers!

I have also posted a few times in the past on this blog related to covers:

Dancing in the Dark — Then and Now

Behind Blue Eyes – Then and Now

Pass the jam

Poetry, man.

Re-Purpose – Part 2

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I didn’t plan to think and write so much about purpose, but I keep coming across interesting related reading so I pick up the thread again…. (“Part 1” here)

An HBR article, You Don’t Find Your Purpose — You Build It, discussed 3 misconceptions about finding purpose in life and each one presents good reminders.  I liked the message that our lives will have multiple sources of purpose that will also provide multiple sources of meaning to our lives.

I read another article that lists 11 myths about finding your purpose.  The author posted a subsequent follow up article that lists 11 Ways to Know When You’ve Found Your Purpose.  I found this statement from the list somewhat encouraging,

And when you find your purpose, when you find the thing that you’ve been preparing for your whole life, you will look back and realize it wasn’t a waste of your time and effort at all.”

Maybe many people are doing “the work” of finding purpose without realizing and without any pressure or stress.  Do we dwell on it too much?  Is it “oversold”?  At what age do we start to worry about our life’s purpose? At what age should we?  How many different stages or repurposes are there in a lifetime?

I thought this was a good article for parents with teens and young adults, Adolescence and Repurposing One’s Life.  I hadn’t thought about stages of growth and independence in terms of a “repurposing” before.  From the article,

So, at both the outset and end of adolescence, interest, meaning, direction, and challenge may need to be altered to redefine and reinvigorate sense of purpose for the next leg of the journey through life.”

With recent news again of another mass shooting at a school, it leaves me with many questions about how an individual may come to believe that their purpose includes such violence.  Complicated and very sad.

I have noticed that the words meaning and purpose are often used interchangeably in regards to one’s life and choices.  I found this 11 min. video thought-provoking about the past and the future:  30000 Days – Living Life with Meaning & Purpose.

I welcome your thoughts on my questions, or links to other related reading on this topic.

Memory matters

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Sad, but true, I finally finished a novel this past summer that I had started reading the previous summer.  I have read most of John Irving’s novels, so I was determined to finish: In One Person.  (From a New York Times review:  “In One Person is a story about memory.”)  I can always count on Irving’s stories and characters to make me think deeply and differently about social justice and issues.  After I finish his novels, there are always a few lines or passages that stick with me.

The main character of In One Person eventually becomes a writer.  Written in the first person, this character quotes some of his own writing and thoughts on growing up (p. 259-260):

That moment when you are tired of being treated like a child – tired of adolescence, too – that suddenly opening but quickly closing passage, when you irreversibly want to grow up, is a dangerous time.”

Ambition robs you of your childhood. The moment you want to become an adult – in any way – something in your childhood dies.”

This bit about memory also lingered with me:

Your memory is a monster; you forget – it doesn’t. It simply files things away; it keeps things for you, or hides things from you. Your memory summons things to your recall with a will of its own. You imagine you have a memory, but your memory has you!”

It is an interesting reminder to me that while growing up is desired and (mostly) inevitable, it can come with a sense of loss.  We have our memories, but maybe some of the forgetting is important in the process of letting go of our childhood and becoming an adult.  Why do we remember certain things and forget other things from our past?  I have about a handful of experiences that I can recall from early childhood, a lot more as an older child, and so on.  It is interesting to think about the early memories that I have retained to this day, and yet they might also be forgotten one day.  I value the different things my memory has helped me with, but it is easy to take it for granted.

I know that memory is extensively researched and continues to be.  There are so many interesting aspects of memory to wonder (and worry!) about.  It intersects with the understanding of cognition, learning, aging, etc.  I recently read the article, Our Memory Quirks:  Are They for Us or against Us?  The author reviews a book about memory research and shares some good points to consider. For example:

False memory research, especially, should concern us in an era in which leaders often lie and fake news has flooded social media.”

And also,

Although some researchers suggest that education might evolve toward critical thinking skills over information memorization, in fact, there is a need for both. Critical reasoning doesn’t work on its own.”

I wonder if collaborative online sites like Wikipedia will become even more important in verifying facts ahead. Check out:  Once Reviled in Education, Wikipedia Now Embraced by Many Professors.

Does our memory have us, or are there things we should do (or should not do) to help memory (short term and long term)?  A very recent study by the University of Waterloo (Ontario), for example, found that reading information aloud improves memory.

I know that I should finish novels in a shorter time!

 

 

Re-Purpose

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I know I am not alone in pondering “mid-life” and/or changes to one’s career or life purpose.  I am also quite sure that I am not alone in wondering how it would be best to make a difference given the current issues of today and recent political news and stories.  I wonder how much this is also on the minds of younger people just starting their careers.  I don’t usually read “life purpose” articles too much, but I recently found some good questions for reflection in this article: Does “Life Purpose” Really Equal Life Happiness?  (shared by @JasonLauritsen on Twitter).  The author makes an interesting distinction between “life purpose” and living “on purpose”.  Here are the questions that caught my interest:

  • What do I feel I should have done by this time in my life? Can I create a similar impact with what I can do now or with the wisdom I have accumulated?
  • What do I want to feel more often in my life? What gives me these feelings now?
  • How can I ensure my commitment to living a life where I feel good about the impact I have on others every day?

Thought I would share, in case it helps anyone else — at any age.  I am not sure I have all the answers yet for myself, but it has helped my thinking, planning and prioritizing.

Poetry, man.

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I thought the news today about Bob Dylan being a winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature was pretty cool.  I appreciate the poetry in his song lyrics, but I read that some didn’t agree with this recognition.  I came to know his music and songs through my following of Melanie’s music career.  I often think of her music and lyrics as poetry, so if she also covered Dylan, than it must be poetry… 🙂

Blowin’ in the Wind was probably one of the first five songs that I learned on guitar, but my favourite Dylan song is Mr. Tambourine Man.  I heard and fell in love with Melanie’s version of it first, of course.  I loved singing along to those lyrics.  I had to listen to both today:

 

Check out this live performance of Bob Dylan in 1964:

 

Who do you consider to be the poetic songwriters of today, or who might be ahead? I have been trying to think who else comes close to Bob Dylan (and Melanie :)).

Pass the jam

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A somewhat random music-related post this time…

Have you seen the Nostalgia Machine? Doug Peterson posted about it recently and I finally tried it out.  It includes music from 1960 to 2013 and it will take you a menu for your chosen year with links to music videos on youtube. Very cool.  It is nice to have another way to round up some good tunes.  The “machine” encourages you to get your childhood jam on, but I can enjoy and get curious about music from pre-2000 just as much as post-2000 🙂

I always have my on-going favourites, from the past and the present.  I like that I experienced the music interests of my 3 older siblings when I was younger.  There was always a good mix of music in our home. And now my daughters share their music with me, “I think you will like this one, Mom…”  They will usually send their recommendation via a youtube link.  I often get lost down the rabbit hole after that.  When I get curious about a song, I usually want to find a video of it performed live. If you follow me on Twitter, you may already know this from my random live music sharing.

I recently went down the ’70s rabbit hole on youtube.  I was checking out some tunes by Lobo (Kent LaVoie) — not even sure how I got there as I wasn’t really a big fan, but there were a few pleasant and simple tunes of the past!  One music video included his version of Reason to Believe and I thought it sounded familiar…  Eventually I figured it out:  I was more familiar with Rod Stewart’s version. And now the curiosity starts.  It often goes something like this for me:

“Then who wrote that one?”.  Youtube suggestions list many others singing that one: Neil Young, Johnny Cash, The Carpenters, etc.  A Google search confirms: Tim Hardin wrote it.

Who is Tim Hardin?” More searching… oh, he sang at Woodstock.  He also died young.

“So, what did he sing at Woodstock?” Ok, I see: If I were a carpenter.  “Oh.. look how many different singers continued to sing that one….” and now I am in the ’60s… and then in the ’80s…

Back to the Nostalgia Machine — what a handy resource for the home and school.  A few posts later, Doug also shared this option to explore more music around the world.

Keep passing the (preserved) jam… always something new to learn through music!

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