I have been sensing some shifts in social media lately and I have been reflecting if it has affected my interest, or whether my priorities and interests have just changed.  In my previous post I wondered about the introduction and the impact of the “mute” option on Twitter.  I realize that some may not have the option if they are using Tweetdeck or other Twitter clients, but I think we still can inadvertently “mute” many people we follow in different ways as we often read from personal lists and we can only read so much.  I sometimes wonder if some people read what others are sharing on Twitter at all.  There is a lot of sharing of links and images on Twitter.  But maybe that is fine, as there are many people who don’t share and prefer to read what others post.

We call it “social” media, but it is easy to sense the promotional focus of it.  I know that more organizations and businesses have embraced social media and that platforms must adjust to user needs as well as stay in business themselves.  Organizations and businesses do share some great content, but their focus is to promote their own purpose or product in the end.

Often when I am trying to understand what I am sensing, something shows up in my social media newsfeeds that helps. I had a listen to this video of a presentation by Gary Vaynerchuk, Stop Storytelling Like It’s 2007.  If you can get past the “F sharps”, he shares many good points and insights about storytelling – why, what, how, and where.  The talk was for a social media marketing audience, but when he said, “Marketers ruin everything”, I listened to the end.  Good points were made about how the “psychology” of the different social media platforms is often missed and how context was more important than content in reaching an audience. His talk captured the realties and challenges of getting the attention of users and consumers, and he reminds that respecting the nuances of each platform is important.

It all makes we wonder where this leaves individuals amidst all the increase of users, platforms, information, and advertising?  Does the individual blogger have to consider marketing strategies and platform psychology in order to have an audience and voice?  Gary suggested that marketers need to tell stories and “give” like a human being, not like a brand.  They need to listen instead of talk and act human every day in “micro moments”.  He suggested that people seem to think they need to be witty on Twitter to get attention, and being kind is not the priority of users.  Is that really the general perception of Twitter users? Is this how marketers will stand out from that?  Gary suggested that marketers and businesses should offer value, respond and engage with users — then asking for their business becomes easier.  Can individuals also have any of these as priorities?  If they did, would they get noticed? Would it seem trustworthy, or suspicious?

I started using Twitter to follow and learn from people and be a part of conversations (where I felt welcome and where I thought I could contribute a helpful perspective).  I have enjoyed sharing perspectives and contributions of others in education conversations and debates.  I have valued what others share using social media and I pass a fair bit of relevant information to each of my family members.  (I should thank and let those people who share those bits know that more.)  I blog and share what I care about, what I find interesting, or what I think my followers might appreciate.  Some people using Twitter suggest that we should refrain from retweeting too much.  But we all have different followers and networks, and someone we follow isn’t just tweeting/retweeting for the benefit of one specific follower.  Also, If someone engages with me, I try my best to respond and acknowledge.  It is manageable when you are not a “rock star” Twitter user 🙂

However, I still wonder how much the changes and the various uses of social media are affecting my experience as I try to stick with what I feel is appropriate for me.  The new Twitter profile encourages us to “pin” selected tweets to “show off your best stuff”.  It can seem as if there is an underlying assumption that we are all about establishing a personal “brand”.  Content and advertising on Facebook seem to be pushing through in different ways.  I am reluctant to “like” anything.  I follow a few people on Twitter who share interesting things about social media, but I also see many articles about improving one’s reach, influence and audience with blogs and Twitter.  Where does this leave individuals just sharing with a purpose and trying to have a network and a voice with no motive for business or monetary gain?

I know I am just a guest in these spaces and there are things that one just has to tolerate, but there have been reports that Twitter has had some challenges in keeping and attracting users.  Why do users leave?  Why can it be difficult to stay? Is it getting more difficult to be ourselves or an individual on social media?  Is it best just to become readers, lurkers, and receivers of information and promotions on social media?  The writer of this article suggests that Twitter now has 2 uses.  1) To support ads as a revenue tool and 2) To snark.  Yet I can think of many people who bring so much more value to Twitter than that.  Many are kind, helpful, and share good insights.

I know we can all adjust our networks, unfollow/unfriend and now mute who we follow on Twitter, but how “social” is this media going to remain ahead?  Was it ever really authentic? Sharing can be caring, but what actually gets attention and shared the most?  How does that impact what individuals do in these spaces? Is it enough to stay purposeful and kind? How do we guide our youth for these spaces and changes ahead?

I am not sure who will read all my thoughts and questions, but I wanted to write them down… see where things go ahead.  Thank you if you did read.  I welcome your thoughts.

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