I often reflect on my social media “diet”… Is it balanced?  Should I consume more of this and less of that?  What should I skim… what should I take with a grain of salt?  Who should I listen to in regards to what is good or better for me?  Will it be suitable to me?  What am I role modelling for my children?  What do my choices, online activity and interactions say about me?  How and where do I choose to connect with others?

While we find ourselves asking these questions as adults (e.g. check out Bill Ferriter’s post), we are also trying to understand and support what is appropriate for children and teens.  Who should do what to nourish and balance the social media “diets” of our youth?  Where does the guidance start?  Can support in the school environment impact choices and behaviour outside of school?  Which has more influence on the choices and behaviour of youth online – home or school?

A related conversation occurred recently between a few education bloggers about supporting youth with social media.  Aviva Dunsiger started the conversation and wondered where lines could be drawn with using social media for learning and personal interactions,

I think that students need a safe place to make mistakes, and I don’t know that social media provides this safe place.

Maybe we need more candid conversations with students about what tools they’re using, how they’re portraying themselves online, and what to do when problems occur.

Please read her full post and the comments here.

Doug Peterson responded to her questions on his blog with the suggestion that student blogging experiences may address many concerns.  Mark Carbone joined the conversation and added his thoughts further in a post on his blog.

I certainly support Doug’s view that blogs are indeed an excellent starting point.  I also think that  the K12 educational experience needs to move beyond this.

I don’t think one can underestimate the power of positive role modelling.  Do you see this as an opportunity for educators? or perhaps a responsibility?

While following the comments of Aviva, Doug, and Mark on each other’s posts, I noticed a post by William Chamberlain in which he reflected about the value of blogging for students.

Doug also weighed back in on the conversation in a subsequent post and mentioned the research and book by Danah Boyd.  As I think by now, like Doug, we all realized, yes, it really is complicated.  Doug ends with,

If you’re interested in another perspective on networking, then you really owe it to yourself to read this book.  Armed, you’re ready to join the conversation.

I recently wrote a summary about Boyd’s work as well.  I posted it along with some questions for parent input and perspectives in on online forum.  There is a lot to consider and discussion is good.  We can all have good intentions to support our children and youth, but the world of online interactions can get very complicated and confusing.  We are all still figuring out this netiquette – as adults and teens.  It must be difficult for teachers as well.  I often wonder if we may just have to accept inconsistency in this area.  Like choosing our diet and habits, there will be inconsistent and conflicting choices between home and school.  Positive role modelling and support may also be inconsistent from place to place…and online space to online space… and home and school.

I would think it is confusing for parents as well.  How can we consider Danah Boyd’s insight to support and respond appropriately as parents and educators together?  I can understand Aviva’s questioning if the internet is the place to make mistakes, especially when consequences can be harsh, if not unwarranted.  I also think that role modelling by parents is really important.  But like diet and food choices, how much can the school impact behaviour online if the messaging at home is different?  As a parent, I have had more concerns with other parents not monitoring enough than over-monitoring.  I don’t have my children as “friends” on Facebook, but we have frequent conversations about the interactions that transpire in that space, and in others.  Yet, there are always new grey areas to discuss.

Let’s keep talking, sharing, and learning from each other.  You might want to consider joining this online chat or “hangout” on April 3rd that Royan Lee has organized to reflect on Danah Boyd’s book.

Post update: Adding the recorded chat/discussion panel that Royan posted to this blog

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